Kidney Dialysis

Approximately 217,000 Americans receive kidney dialysis. Since the late 1960s, this procedure has been used in place of kidneys damaged by disease, birth defects, or injury. Dialysis may be temporary (until the kidneys resume functioning), or until the patient receives a transplant, or for a lifetime if those options are not available.

  • Trinity Kidney Dialysis Unit

    Established in 1977, Trinity’s KDU serves patients from throughout the northwest region of our state, providing some 4,000 hemodialysis treatments annually. Hemodialysis is available on site six days a week (Monday through Saturday) for approximately 47 patients, who dialyze 2-3 days a week for 3-4 hours.

    In addition:

    • An ambulatory peritoneal dialysis program may be available if qualified
    • The unit offers privacy, convenient parking, quick access, and surroundings designed with patient comfort in mind
    • Medical staff at the nursing station monitor patients during treatments
    • Trinity’s KDU is under the medical direction of Nasser Saffarian, MD, a board certified Nephrologist. Call 701-857-5404 for more information.
    • A smaller unit - Trinity Dialysis Services - is located in Belcourt, North Dakota

    What is Hemodialysis?

    In very simple terms the kidneys “clean” your blood of waste products. Dialysis mimics the normal function of human kidneys. A pump (the dialysis machine) moves your blood through a filter (called a dialyzer). Blood passes on one side of the filter and a special solution (produced by the machine) passes on the other side. This solution draws excess fluids and waste out of your blood and through the filter. Your blood cells cannot pass through the filter’s fine pores.

  • What is Peritoneal Dialysis?

    Another type of treatment is called peritoneal dialysis. In this method a fluid (dialysate) is put into your abdominal (peritoneal) cavity through a small tube. The fluid draws waste from your blood and is drained from your body through the tube. The most common type of peritoneal dialysis is called Continuous Cyclic Peritoneal Dialysis (CCPD), which is normally done at night with a machine that automatically drains and refills the fluid in the abdomen.